The Eskdale and Liddesdale Estate

A beautiful, energetic estate comprising approximately 74,000 acres that stretches from the English border to Hawick, The Eskdale & Liddesdale Estate runs almost continuously along the Eskdale, Liddesdale and Ewes valleys.

Located on the Estate, Langholm Lodge served as the Buccleuch family headquarters for 150 years before demolition as a result of military occupation during World War II.

The Estate is currently home to the Langholm Moor Demonstration Project, which in tandem with the UK government, RSPB and GWCT is looking at new ways of managing commercial grouse moors and birds of prey.

Consultations:

Forestry Consultation – Cockplay

Forestry
The Eskdale & Liddesdale Estate contains in excess of 6,000 acres of commercial woodland supplemented by approximately 2,000 acres of amenity woodland. A significant diversity of species provides a wide range of habitat and helps shape the landscape of this part of Dumfries & Galloway and the Scottish Borders whilst providing important local economic benefits. The forestry will continue to be an important enterprise on the Estate with significant in-house experience in its management.

Langholm Moor Project
The Langholm Moor Demonstration Project is focused on resolving the raptor-grouse moor debate by restoring grouse moor management to the Langholm Moor in order to meet the conservation needs of the site. The demonstration comprises:

- Resolving conflicts between moorland management for raptors and red grouse

- Maintaining hen harrier population as viable component of the SPA

- Extending and improving heather moorland habitat

- Improving grouse production
Agriculture
The Eskdale & Liddesdale Estate can be split into two distinct agricultural areas with the southern half of the Estate next to the national border being productive low land suitable for dairy, beef and sheep farming whilst supporting some arable production. The northern half of the Estate, which consists of extensive hill farms combines the challenges of farming in a unforgiving environment with the rewards from extensive sheep farming in one of Scotland’s most beautiful landscapes.
Energy
The southern half of the Eskdale & Liddesdale Estate encompasses many years of history of mining on the renowned Canonbie Coalfield. With key industry partners, the Estate is working to realise coal and coal bed methane opportunities, which could prove vital for the UK’s energy security. Importantly, the estate must also work closely with the communities within the geographical area who could benefit from the potential socio/economic impacts
Property
The Eskdale & Liddesdale Estate includes a wide portfolio of residential properties in stunning locations across the Estate. Ideally located within 30 minutes of the M6/M74, the residential properties benefit from the tranquillity that comes from the setting and surrounding landscape whilst being accessible and well served.
Fishing
Buccleuch manage some 20 miles of what is considered to be some of the best sea trout fishing in the South of Scotland; the Esk & Liddle are well known for their run of sea trout, and for the salmon run during the second half of the season.

The beats on the Esk form much of the middle section of the system whilst on the Liddle the two beats are in the middle and lower sections. Both the Esk and Liddle flow through picturesque countryside typical of the Border area and much of the bankside is wooded with indigenous hardwoods. The rivers are generally fast flowing, with beds of rock outcrop or pebble shingle with no natural weed growth.

The Esk may be regarded as "gin clear" except during periods of high water. The Liddle, except during periods of fairly low levels, often carries peat stain, although this does not have much impact upon fish taking.

THE SEASON
The salmon season opens on April 1st and continues until 31st October. Spring runs of fish, in common with many other rivers, have sadly declined and only odd fish enter the system during the February/May period. However, given good river levels from late June or thereabouts, fish start to run into the lower beats such as Canonbie and Lower Liddle. Late July usually heralds the arrival of the summer run and, if conditions remain suitable, will continue until they merge with the main autumn runs around mid-September, which generally increase until the season closes.

Both rivers produce salmon weighing well into the teens of pounds and twenty pounders plus are caught every season. The sea trout season commences on the 1st April and continues until 30th September. Given good running conditions, fish in the 4 - 7lb class are usually present on the opening day. A gradual increase in sea trout continues until early August or later in some seasons. The average weight of the main runs is usually 1 -2 lbs with a few larger specimens up to 10lbs.

SUMMARY OF BEATS
Irvine Lower – 1280 metres of mainly double bank fishing, including Copper Stone and Fossil Beds
Gilnockie Tower - 1234 metres of double bank fishing including Tower Pool and Caul' Pool
Hollows - 823 metres double bank fishing including Shortsholm, Brig and Chapel pools

Rods rotate around each beat on a daily basis.
Fishing
Fishing
Buccleuch manage some 20 miles of what is considered to be some of the best sea trout fishing in the South of Scotland; the Esk & Liddle are well known for their run of sea trout, and for the salmon run during the second half of the season.

The beats on the Esk form much of the middle section of the system whilst on the Liddle the two beats are in the middle and lower sections. Both the Esk and Liddle flow through picturesque countryside typical of the Border area and much of the bankside is wooded with indigenous hardwoods. The rivers are generally fast flowing, with beds of rock outcrop or pebble shingle with no natural weed growth.

The Esk may be regarded as "gin clear" except during periods of high water. The Liddle, except during periods of fairly low levels, often carries peat stain, although this does not have much impact upon fish taking.

THE SEASON
The salmon season opens on April 1st and continues until 31st October. Spring runs of fish, in common with many other rivers, have sadly declined and only odd fish enter the system during the February/May period. However, given good river levels from late June or thereabouts, fish start to run into the lower beats such as Canonbie and Lower Liddle. Late July usually heralds the arrival of the summer run and, if conditions remain suitable, will continue until they merge with the main autumn runs around mid-September, which generally increase until the season closes.

Both rivers produce salmon weighing well into the teens of pounds and twenty pounders plus are caught every season. The sea trout season commences on the 1st April and continues until 30th September. Given good running conditions, fish in the 4 - 7lb class are usually present on the opening day. A gradual increase in sea trout continues until early August or later in some seasons. The average weight of the main runs is usually 1 -2 lbs with a few larger specimens up to 10lbs.

SUMMARY OF BEATS
Irvine Lower – 1280 metres of mainly double bank fishing, including Copper Stone and Fossil Beds
Gilnockie Tower - 1234 metres of double bank fishing including Tower Pool and Caul' Pool
Hollows - 823 metres double bank fishing including Shortsholm, Brig and Chapel pools

Rods rotate around each beat on a daily basis.